Jump to content
Genetry Solar Forums

Firmware Version 1.1r6


Recommended Posts

So I'm considerably slower at this than I had originally intended to be...but I figured that if I keep just tweaking and kicking the can down the road, I'll never release a final update...!

This update (as of 2022-02-26) is ONLY for the GS inverters with Rev. C boards.  (Will not show for the A.1 / B boards.)  I do hope to carry a number of the features over to the A.1 / B boards at some point, though.  As well as the GS-upgraded PJ inverters...

 

Note here that features with a [C] prefix will ONLY be available on Rev. C boards--due to the added monitoring and control capability in the hardware.

  • [C] add input/output amperage sensor calibrations (due to unexpected extreme variance in sensors)
    • You may need to calibrate the sensors after installing the update!
  • [C] add AC Input Current readout on LCD.  Finally, the inverter will show how much power it measures on the AC input
  • [C] finally begin preliminary implementation of the AC Input MaxAmp functionality.  This allows you to tell the inverter "this is the maximum amount of power that the input can handle." 
    • please note, the "hybrid" power sharing is NOT yet implemented.
    • inverter also will not trip off/shut down/switch back to battery if this is exceeded.  Forthcoming!
    • Battery charge will automatically throttle down in response to loads (all the way down to 0% if needed!)  Will automatically come back up to the "Charge Amps" value if allowed.  Note that "MaxAmp" will limit the maximum charge current.  ("Charge Amps" now specifies a ratio from the inverter's wattage rating.)
  • [C] fix AC input-output voltage matching for seamless transition (apparently randomly getting reset to config voltage)
  • [C] fix noise on AC input voltage readout when no AC input voltage present
  • [C] fix revised Power Save functionality not engaging from Command menu
  • [C] minor modifications to error handling, now non-critical errors end at zero crossing
  • [C] revamp overload alarm/error code entirely, now CPU is responsible for detecting overload.
    • overload timer is based on the overload percentage--i.e. a higher overload will shut down far quicker than a small overload.
  • [B/C] fix power-off "pop" from transformer (now ends sine at zero crossing before power down)
    • A.1 boards do not have a means to monitor (or override) the power button, so they end the wave whenever the lights go out...
  • fix missing gate on "battery charge" threshold causing it to switch to AC Mains even if Battery Charge was set to Manual
  • add "Toggle" generator start mode for Westinghouse/Cummings ST-Switch compatibility
    • i.e. only "presses start [B]" if generator state needs changed.  [A] still is "Ignition"
    • [you can thank @BlackWaterPark for this feature.  Sorry to say, though, the inverter will never be able to pull-start your genset for you 🤣]
  • restore "Unlock Inverter" menu item (code bug!)
    • fix broken gate on "Unlimited" setting
  • fix JSON / remote server thermistor (non-readout) bug caused by adding Rev. C support
  • correct UVP/OVP Alarm hysteresis...was >2v instead of 0.25v.  Oops!  No wonder it was hard to get the inverter to stop "alarming" about low battery...
  • revise Command menu behavior (ATS only visible if AC Input present)
  • begin to implement PFC charge functionality (to increase charge efficiency)...still needs a lot of work.  Only got close to a nice sine wave on my bench--field tests thus far haven't looked anything like a sine.  Oh, well...
    • PLEASE SET "BATTERY/CHARGE -> CHARGE AMPS" TO A LOW NUMBER (<20%) BEFORE STARTING CHARGE AFTER THIS UPDATE!  The charge current regulation thresholds have been significantly changed--causing charge to run a significantly higher amperage at the same setting.
  • finally implement timed multistage battery charge (i.e. bulk -> float/disconnect after CC->CV timer expires)
    • you can configure "end of charge" command to for ATS back to battery, gen stop, float, etc.
  • add "TEST" mode (CFG -> System -> Mode = "Test Mode")
    • identified by flashing purple power LED.  Will pop up a "TEST" page, where you can manually switch each section of the inverter (relays, FETs, etc.) for diagnostic/test purposes.  NOTE: Will immediately throw an error if AC voltage detected on either output or input, for safety reasons.

 

I've still got lots of stuff to work on for 1.1r7...once we get the 12kw saga finally on the road.

 

To calibrate the AC current sensors, it's easiest to do this with an AC input, and the inverter in Pass-Thru mode (i.e. no charge), and a single load.  A clamp AC meter is extremely valuable here as well.  NOTE: If you don't use AC input, you probably can ignore all of this!

 

Step 1: Identifying the problem 😉.  You might be fortunate and the sensors in your inverter are perfectly matched--that'd be great.  Unfortunately, we've measured a significant manufacturer tolerance in the sensors...causing this issue.

With the load on the inverter (a purely resistive load on a single phase like a hair dryer/hot air gun is highly recommended), you should see something like this:

image.png.2a99b0a5e41f5d9016013020546d0727.png

Note the clamp meter is registering a load of 9.63A.  The inverter, however, is reading 10.0A on the output, and 12.2A on the input.  Oops!

NOTE: The amperage numbers shown on the Calibrate Readings screen are scaled to amps in 120v regardless of the actual output/input voltage!  This is to make field calibrating as easy as possible.

 

Step 2: Correcting the issue:

Adjust the calibration points on the "AC In" and "AC Out" lines until the amperage numbers to the left are as close as reasonably possible to the reading on your clamp meter (or Kill-A-Watt).

image.png.ead72508d62a7f17d059abebc5a4f595.png

Sorry for the "ghetto quality" of the photos...I wasn't expecting to post this when I took them 😉.

For my test bench inverter, the required calibration for "AC In" was -10.  "AC Out" required -60. 

 

 

As always, keep me up to date with any issues or problems.  Our goal is to make the best inverter we can 😉.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, The Blind Wolf said:

So when will my main board update it self to rev C???  Oh and what is the latest Rev for the B board I think that the one I got.  I'm at 1.1.3

Well, the former is gonna take some help to do 😉.  If you have a sighted friend who's really good with electronics, a Rev. B to Rev. C upgrade is not terribly hard--and I'd be willing to provide the support needed over video call to make sure it's all done right.

Latest firmware currently for the B board is 1.1r5, though there are some issues with the WiFi temperature monitoring (caused by adding Rev. C support)...so hopefully before TOO long I'll get 1.1r6 out for the B boards as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, considering my B boasrd is running with no issue, I'm not any hurry to upgrad it anyhow.

 

Hourmeter
999 hours

KWh
65.6kWH

Firmware
1.1r3

 

Still going. When you get the code fixed and update, I'll update the firmware, and I should have the slave up by then, .  My master gs don't have no battery saftey going on it at the moment, cause I can go below 20v and it won't even make a peep about it. which isn't good.  I've noticed when running AGM batts that the more amps you pull the more it sag on VDC. think I might need to get some dc caps to help the batts from doing that. or get more of them. but even at 93amps its going from 26v to 24.1v and thats basicly  the highest I've pushed it thus far..  Not sure how many caps the rev b board has. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, The Blind Wolf said:

cause I can go below 20v and it won't even make a peep about it. which isn't good.

That'd be a software setting.

 

10 hours ago, The Blind Wolf said:

I've noticed when running AGM batts that the more amps you pull the more it sag on VDC. think I might need to get some dc caps to help the batts from doing that.

Caps won't help that.  They only help with instantaneous surges--but they cannot increase the battery voltage.  That's just lead-acid being lead-acid.

 

10 hours ago, The Blind Wolf said:

Not sure how many caps the rev b board has. 

Mainboard in the inverter has the full complement of 4x 10,000uF 80v caps; that's not part of the control board which I'm referring to with Rev. A / B / C.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Caps won't help that.  They only help with instantaneous surges--but they cannot increase the battery voltage.  That's just lead-acid being lead-acid.

Mainboard in the inverter has the full complement of 4x 10,000uF 80v caps; that's not part of the control board which I'm referring to with Rev. A / B / C.

I  am  confused  about  why he  wants to  modify  the  GS6kw  with  cap  when   the GS6kw  is working like it suppose to  .    He can not modify a  GS6kw  like  I  can a  Powerjack  inverter .   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Dixin isn't you in flordia? want to come up here and upgrade my gs lol.  I've just noticed something, and might be the reason why my washer hates the gs inverter, though it never did on the pj though the pj was 12v and that was easier to drive then a 24v since I didn't need to double up on 12v batts.  anyhow.  the last few days here the sun hasn't been out its been cloudy at most and raining at worse the whole time, during this time I was cooking and running my ice maker mainly off the gs.  I noticed, that my ice maker would start making all sorts of loud sounds while running and get worse and worse as the days went on.  Well since 9 this morning and having a good strong sun shine and my charger pumping all that power into the agm batts and it was at 28.1 my ice maker don't even make any fuss while running.  So, thats basicly telling me, that the sign wave gets really crappy at certin volts. not sure if its cause of the voltage or it having a time pulling the needed amps from the bank. if its doing this on agm, I'm guessing the gs isn't really design to run on agm batts cause  there is no way unless the sun is out to keep a agm battery bank above 26v.  unlike the lfo batts that can stay at 13.6 while pushing power.  Might have to put at least one lfo in the agm bank just to help provide the voltage sag..  So tha talso means while trying to run 240v, with one gs being agm and the other lfo its going to be one dirty power.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pretty confident that Sid and Sean would have tested the GS at a range of DC side voltages and would have addressed any issues they found.

What you man be seeing, perhaps, is your AGM battery bank's (this includes all wiring, breakers, joints, terminals etc) impedance.  The change in AC output power across the AC sinewave is reflected in DC amps draw.  If there is a problem with your battery system it may be dipping significantly in voltage available to the inverter when the DC amps goes up.  You will not see this with a standard amp meter, clamp or otherwise.  What you need to do is put your multimeter into AC volts mode and measure across the DC input on the inverter.  You must measure at the inverter's terminals, ie the meter probes touch the inverter's terminals not the wiring ring lugs etc, nor anywhere else.  Not all multimeters are good for this either as reading AC volts with a significant DC voltage present too can cause problems.  You should aim for less than 300mV of ripple (that can also be described as 600mV peak to peak) at the inverter's DC input.

Edited by TheButcher
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Might have to put at least one lfo in the agm bank just to help provide the voltage sag..  So tha talso means while trying to run 240v, with one gs being agm and the other lfo its going to be one dirty power.

I  parallel my  AGM  with lithium  to get a good sine wave .    My  washer will never run on AGM  alone as the voltage is  54v DC from  four AGM battery .   i parallel lithium ion battery  to get 61v DC .   Your lithium  ifo battery  will only go to 29v DC  which give a sine wave for a short time  and then your AC output will sag  and your ice maker make  noise .      I  do not live in Florida .   I live in a state that  do not like DIY  solar or  DIY battery  or noise  after 10 pm and  the public utilty control everything  including solar and water   and  is sunny all  the time   and  120 degree in the summer       

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, dickson said:

Might have to put at least one lfo in the agm bank just to help provide the voltage sag..  So tha talso means while trying to run 240v, with one gs being agm and the other lfo its going to be one dirty power.

I  parallel my  AGM  with lithium  to get a good sine wave .    My  washer will never run on AGM  alone as the voltage is  54v DC from  four AGM battery .   i parallel lithium ion battery  to get 61v DC .   Your lithium  ifo battery  will only go to 29v DC  which give a sine wave for a short time  and then your AC output will sag  and your ice maker make  noise .      I  do not live in Florida .   I live in a state that  do not like DIY  solar or  DIY battery  or noise  after 10 pm and  the public utilty control everything  including solar and water   and  is sunny all  the time   and  120 degree in the summer       

Sounds like the state al the way west coast. .  well, putting one 12v lfo with one 12v agm should make the voltage stay up higher longer then normal, though the agm would dip lower on the VDC way before the lfo would.  I wished I saved up and waited till now to buy all the stuff I did, I could have got double what I got in lfo for the same price.and I should have went 48vdc, though now its too late to do so, cause I would need to buyu so many batts to even do 48v.  Oh well.  I'm just doom until I get another round of throw money away from the goverment again.  I still got to put up my other solar array, I only get my max charge around 8-2p.m. with the current array I got, which is facing SW.  Which is odd, I need to put on SE so I can I guess get the afternoon sun.  *laughs*  and yes I type the direction in corectly. and the time as well. not sure why my max power input is durin the morning time. figured it would be from noon to sunset.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, The Blind Wolf said:

So, thats basicly telling me, that the sign wave gets really crappy at certin volts. not sure if its cause of the voltage or it having a time pulling the needed amps from the bank. if its doing this on agm, I'm guessing the gs isn't really design to run on agm batts cause  there is no way unless the sun is out to keep a agm battery bank above 26v.  unlike the lfo batts that can stay at 13.6 while pushing power.

You might be onto something--because the lowest voltage at which the GS6 in 24v mode can mathematically output a pure sine wave is 22.6v (no load).  However, a PJ at 12v would be giving you more like a square wave out--and apparently the washer didn't complain with that??

 

I gotta get some sort of way to get plain text on laptop webpage so you can easily access all the diagnostic info on the inverter....that'd tell us a lot 😉.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

With my 12v PJ 8k it ran the washer with no issue what so ever, and with other loads, but, by it self yes it ran it no issue, even my other cheap 12v 3k inverters could run it and have no issue, and I normaly had 4 agm batts or all the lfo hooked up , didn't matter what I had it running off of, I had a switch to switch over from agm to lfo 12v banks.  the washer would run fine, while the PJ inverter would be screaming from the coil.

 

Yeah I still useing the web site you made me, it keeps refreshing on me which throws me off while trying to read somthing and have to scroll back over and over to get the info, normaly I just select all and paste the info into notepad to see what it saying at thtat moment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Sid Genetry Solar said:

You might be onto something--because the lowest voltage at which the GS6 in 24v mode can mathematically output a pure sine wave is 22.6v (no load).  However, a PJ at 12v would be giving you more like a square wave out--and apparently the washer didn't complain with that??

 

22.6V at low draw equates to an almost completely discharged '24v' AGM battery.  An AGM with a higher SOC should be able to hold the voltage up higher than that unless it is being discharged at an abnormally high rate vs its AH rating.  I don't see anything wrong with the GS' minimum clean sine wave supply voltage being 22.6.  If @The Blind Wolf is seeing voltage that low at his inverter that's more a failing of his battery system than the GS IMO.  See my post about battery impedance.

The fact that the appliances connected to the GS do not have the problem when the AGM is fully charged and plenty of solar is available to hold the battery at 28.1V only adds to my suspicions that there is a problem with the overall impedance of the battery / cabling etc.  Checking what is happening at the inverter's terminals could well be insightful.

Edited by TheButcher
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 I normaly had 4 agm batts or all the lfo hooked up , didn't matter what I had it running off of, I had a switch to switch over from agm to lfo 12v banks.  the washer would run fine

FOUR  AGM  in  parallel  for a 12v  inverter the  voltage will stay  above  14v and be a sine wave  while  the washer is running .    Two  AGM  in series  for 24v  the  voltage will  sag  fast  and  the output AC  will also sag  and not run the washer  .     

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@The Blind Wolfseems to have 2 problems really.  1, washing machine won't run unless there is an additional load on the inverter; 2, some appliances are noisy when battery voltage is low.  The washing machine is an interesting one and not directly related to battery voltage otherwise an additional load would make it worse.  The noisy appliance one is quite possibly being cause by low battery voltage as the AC waveform peaks, ie, the battery or some other component of the DC supply to the inverter is not up to the task at hand.  At least that's my take on things.

i can't make head nor tail of exactly how he has his AGM batteries arranged so it might be useful if the exact configuration is posted.  It has been stated that 80A is being pulled from the battery so how ever it is arranged it's going to have to have a lot of amp hours at what ever voltage to be happy supplying 80A.

Edited by TheButcher
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, TheButcher said:

@The Blind Wolfseems to have 2 problems really.  1, washing machine won't run unless there is an additional load on the inverter; 2, some appliances are noisy when battery voltage is low.  The washing machine is an interesting one and not directly related to battery voltage otherwise an additional load would make it worse.  The noisy appliance one is quite possibly being cause by low battery voltage as the AC waveform peaks, ie, the battery or some other component of the DC supply to the inverter is not up to the task at hand.  At least that's my take on things.

i can't make head nor tail of exactly how he has his AGM batteries arranged so it might be useful if the exact configuration is posted.  It has been stated that 80A is being pulled from the battery so how ever it is arranged it's going to have to have a lot of amp hours at what ever voltage to be happy supplying 80A.

I have direct wire fon neg with thre 0/1 awg wire each from one 24v set, then postive I have two of the 24v  set going to one 24v set batt useing same size wire, then same size wire going to a 400amp t fuse then to gs.  This is all basicly direct. no switch between, then mksb charger is wired to one of the batts to charge.  I check voltage o n each batt while under load and compared it to what the gs was reporting and its correct, each 12v is the same voltage as well, so no inbalance on that.  I have 2 31group deep cycle agm, and 4 31group tractor batt from my big box truck which I used to use on a 12v system pulling over 400 amps  under a full load.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A Google search shows that group 31 batteries are often around 100AH but can be higher rated but since you don't say I'll assume 100AH.  Since you didn't actually say I'll assume you have 1 x 2 of the deep cycle batteries in series and 2 x 2 tractor batteries in series; arranged in parallel.

The deep cycle batteries would probably give you 100AH at the 20 hour rate.

The tractor batteries, well, what exactly is a tractor battery?  It's probably heavy cranking batteries to start a recalcitrant diesel.  If so they aren't intended to prop up sustained loads over hours rather supply bulk current for minutes at a time.  Amp hours there when used as a storage battery?  God only knows.

Short term amps available at 1C, ie running the AGMs hard, 300.  Load distribution over the 3 24V batteries, God only knows since the batteries are intended for very different roles.  The voltages on the 24v sets will by definition be nigh on identical since they are paralleled with the difference being millivolts as determined by drop in the wiring.  If there was a volt of difference I'd be quite concerned with the wiring.

In the short term the overall battery bank should be fine with 80A, in the long term ie once the battery becomes discharged to a reasonable degree, I'm guessing not so much.  The tractor batteries will be running out of puff putting more load onto the AGMs.  A clamp meter on the wiring between the 12V batteries in each 24V string will show the average of what is going on there but not the fine detail.

A measurement of the AC ripple at the inverter's input along with the average DC reading will tell exactly what the inverter is having to cope with in terms of voltage.  Let's say you have a DC reading of 23V and a ripple reading of 800mV.  Your DC supply is now dipping to 22.2V and that goes into the territory where Sid has stated the GS can't hold a clean sinewave, ie the peaks will be getting clipped.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Let's say you have a DC reading of 23V and a ripple reading of 800mV.  Your DC supply is now dipping to 22.2V and that goes into the territory where Sid has stated the GS can't hold a clean sinewave, ie the peaks will be getting clipped.

The AGM battery in series  sag fast  and the  AC output will be too low  to run the washer  or ice machine make a lot of noise .   AGM battery 4 in parallel  do not sag  and hold the  14v  and  the 12v  inverter  output will be a sine wave .      My  4 AGM in series  if drop to 50 volts will then  drop to 44 v in 5 minutes  and the 48v  inverter  will shut down if I  do not go outside  to switchh on more   lithium ion battery .     That when the LED  light  wil flicker and I  had to run outside fast  or the  inverter shutdown  with  red light alarm .    

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, TheButcher said:

The tractor batteries, well, what exactly is a tractor battery?  It's probably heavy cranking batteries to start a recalcitrant diesel.  If so they aren't intended to prop up sustained loads over hours rather supply bulk current for minutes at a time.  Amp hours there when used as a storage battery?  God only knows.

Just fairly inexpensive, LA, high CCA batteries. Not designed for deep discharge. Suitable for off grid if you baby them. I use them for surge demand.

FWIW, the price of cheap LiFePO4's are pretty comparable to AGMs when you take into account round-trip efficiency (90% vs 80%) and practical capacity (90% vs 50%), and superior when you look at EFCs. (>10K w/ optimized SOC range vs ... 500??)
If batteries are dogging ya, just buy the LIs and call it a day. It's not worth settling when the basic numbers are 3.5$/AH vs 1$/AH.
The main reason to not use them is when you can't provide reasonable environmental conditions. (particularly when can't prevent freezing conditions)

Batteries are definitely not the problem with his washing machine, though.

22 minutes ago, dickson said:

The AGM battery in series  sag fast  and the  AC output will be too low  to run the washer  or ice machine make a lot of noise .   AGM battery 4 in parallel  do not sag  and hold the  14v  and  the 12v  inverter  output will be a sine wave. 

Voltage sag should be relatively the same for a relatively sized load with relatively sized bank and wiring, no matter how many you have in series. I use a 24v system because 24v alternators are widely available. I'd love to use 48v, but 48v alternators are a bit exotic. 🙂

On 2/26/2022 at 12:37 PM, Sid Genetry Solar said:
  • [C] add input/output amperage sensor calibrations (due to unexpected extreme variance in sensors)
    • You may need to calibrate the sensors after installing the update!

Great!
Glad to hear that the amp calibration will be available. I am certain my GS reads a fair bit low. I managed to "overheat" the unit in 40f ambient without it registering an overload. Figure it's just reading low and thus didn't recognize the overload condition.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, TheButcher said:

A Google search shows that group 31 batteries are often around 100AH but can be higher rated but since you don't say I'll assume 100AH.  Since you didn't actually say I'll assume you have 1 x 2 of the deep cycle batteries in series and 2 x 2 tractor batteries in series; arranged in parallel.

The deep cycle batteries would probably give you 100AH at the 20 hour rate.

The tractor batteries, well, what exactly is a tractor battery?  It's probably heavy cranking batteries to start a recalcitrant diesel.  If so they aren't intended to prop up sustained loads over hours rather supply bulk current for minutes at a time.  Amp hours there when used as a storage battery?  God only knows.

Short term amps available at 1C, ie running the AGMs hard, 300.  Load distribution over the 3 24V batteries, God only knows since the batteries are intended for very different roles.  The voltages on the 24v sets will by definition be nigh on identical since they are paralleled with the difference being millivolts as determined by drop in the wiring.  If there was a volt of difference I'd be quite concerned with the wiring.

In the short term the overall battery bank should be fine with 80A, in the long term ie once the battery becomes discharged to a reasonable degree, I'm guessing not so much.  The tractor batteries will be running out of puff putting more load onto the AGMs.  A clamp meter on the wiring between the 12V batteries in each 24V string will show the average of what is going on there but not the fine detail.

A measurement of the AC ripple at the inverter's input along with the average DC reading will tell exactly what the inverter is having to cope with in terms of voltage.  Let's say you have a DC reading of 23V and a ripple reading of 800mV.  Your DC supply is now dipping to 22.2V and that goes into the territory where Sid has stated the GS can't hold a clean sinewave, ie the peaks will be getting clipped.

Yes, the big batts are rated for over 100ah, just with a lot of cranking amps, like I said used them on my 24ft box truck with a 12v system running a AC, lights and two freezers.

 

after a good sunny day today I just got the batts charged up to 29.2 v, and its not een dropping in voltage while under a load at the moment.

 

I also did a whole house test, to see what that master will be mainly running in the house, come to find out. it won't be running the washer, or frig, or anything in the kitchen, just the basic stuff in the bed rooms from what I could find running, so that tells me my Slave is going to be the work horse on my panel when it ocmes to runing kitchen and washer and so forth, the only time the master will be hit the hardest, is when a 240v load kick on, and the only thing I have that it uses that is my 3 ton system, water heater and dryier. since I don't use a stove any more.

 

so once I get my lfo all arranged and setup, that should be a good thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

49 minutes ago, NotMario said:

FWIW, the price of cheap LiFePO4's are pretty comparable to AGMs when you take into account round-trip efficiency (90% vs 80%) and practical capacity (90% vs 50%), and superior when you look at EFCs. (>10K w/ optimized SOC range vs ... 500??)
If batteries are dogging ya, just buy the LIs and call it a day. It's not worth settling when the basic numbers are 3.5$/AH vs 1$/AH.
The main reason to not use them is when you can't provide reasonable environmental conditions. (particularly when can't prevent freezing conditions)

 

lifepo4 is much better suited to the solar life too.  They don't care about being PSOC cycled, don't have the long dwindling tail current of lead acid batteries and don't need a generator available to bring them up to full charge if solar is lacking for several days / a week.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, deeezz said:

Is this firmware update ready for installation? If so I am having trouble seeing the update. I have the original 1a inverter that was upgraded to the c board last summer.

You'll need an active WiFi connection (with the MQTT config set to the default "wifi.genetrysolar.com"), and need to set the "Update Branch" to "Revision."  (It won't show up on Major or Minor.)  If it's not on Revision, then set it to Revision...exit the WiFi page and restart the inverter.  Should show up when it reconnects.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...