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Help: Possible Power Jack transformer


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Sean demonstrated the current ATS functionality of the GS inverters in this video:

I  already  wired  a  separate 50 amp  breaker box  for output  to a 12kw GS inverter  to be use like in Sean  video  wiIn    Grid  Backup    that  a powerjack  can not do .   A  single  100 feet neutral  wire  connect  the   breaker  box to the  main service  entrance  box neutral bus   and  a separate  ground wire go  to the  main  entrance  ground rod .  No  inverter  to hook up at this time  .      

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On 11/27/2021 at 1:01 PM, Sid Genetry Solar said:

Sean demonstrated the current ATS functionality of the GS inverters in this video:

 

That is great! Im from Puerto Rico.. will i be able to buy the 12kw one when it gets released?

 

On other topic.

Are this calculation for 5kva autotransformer core vs size and winding are correct? Im trying to understand what is really needed for actual continuos 5000kw

 

transformer core size.png

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39 minutes ago, christianrodher said:

That is great! Im from Puerto Rico.. will i be able to buy the 12kw one when it gets released?

If you have a freight forwarder based in the U.S., I suppose so.  We don't like to bother with international shipping, as the risks are considerably higher, and there's a lot more that can go wrong with shipping.

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40 minutes ago, christianrodher said:

Are this calculation for 5kva autotransformer core vs size and winding are correct? Im trying to understand what is really needed for actual continuos 5000kw

I don't know THAT much about transformer core size...as the composition of the core material will significantly change the requirements...but I DO know that at least so far, the maximum power limitation of a transformer core (at least for a toroidal core), is not so much the core itself, as it is the ability to get sufficient wire around the core to carry the necessary load.  There's probably a point at which this isn't always the case--but at least so far, the wire losses are by and far the biggest issue.

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Most of it is surely heat dissipation as the limit, beside the obvious physical size limit. Plan the wind around having about 1 tesla flux density. A well designed transformer will have roughly equal volumes of copper on the primary and secondary. Ben knows how to wind a good transformer. I don't know how to tag him but he's searchable here.

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5 minutes ago, InPhase said:

Most of it is surely heat dissipation as the limit, beside the obvious physical size limit. Plan the wind around having about 1 tesla flux density. A well designed transformer will have roughly equal volumes of copper on the primary and secondary. Ben knows how to wind a good transformer. I don't know how to tag him but he's searchable here.

@Ben the transformer expert on the forums, just don't tell Amber 😉.

Yes, heat dissipation does limit things; however, if the core is good, it seems that the majority of the heat dissipation is a result of losses in the windings.

I determine the winding loss by ohming the coils out: a 50A Juntek CC/CV power supply comes in REAL handy for that!  Once the winding losses are calculated, I can then subtract said known losses from the measured total system losses to determine how much of the loss is accounted for.  And more often than not, most all of the losses are in the windings...leaving comparatively little for the core and switching/FETs.

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So just need a big enough coil to give the winding the number of turn necesary for "center taped double cable winding" 120v in 10awg cable for 20amps. i don't know if thats the correct name for that winding lol I saw video that i need to give turn to 2 cables at the same time... then find the center tap and solder those 2 wires together to form the N. 

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On 11/25/2021 at 11:04 AM, Sid Genetry Solar said:

Ha, no.  That's a current sense device, you'll blow it up very quickly with 240v.

 

 

Try this:

 

image.png.4576a45053105019d44e11cfe82dbcc8.png

Being a Chinese inverter, I doubt the ground point will have much to do with anything.  The serious issue comes in if it's tied/coupled to the inverter's "Neutral", which is being used as L2.  Shorting this L2 to the new Neutral generated by the transformer CAN cause serious issues, and it's best left unconnected IMO.

 

It worked! But as you said the transformer is unbalanced. I get 120 from one pole and 110 from the other pole. The inverter is 230vac... Maybe if I buy a inverter 240 I'll get 125 from one pole and 115 from the other pole and make both phases good. 110 is kinda to low.

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8 hours ago, christianrodher said:

It worked! But as you said the transformer is unbalanced. I get 120 from one pole and 110 from the other pole.

You can correct this if you have enough heavier gauge wire...if you add ~10 turns to the "low" pole on the transformer, it will increase the voltage.  You can experiment with the number of turns to get it perfectly balanced.

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