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  1. It's hooked up & running great. I'm glad it finally got it here, I was about to throw in the towel & get a Growatt but this is better suited for an off grid system & I'm really impressed with it's performance so far. The fans sound like a jet engine firing up on start up but at 25% load the fans just come on at a low speed & shuts back down pretty fast. Very quite at that load. I fried a charger tho, forgot to disconnect them before switching to 48v & they were set for 24v. Funny tho, 1 of them is still ok but that was an expensive goof up but now that I'm on 48v, the surviving charger will now take double the panel input & give me the same power as both running at 24v so it won't set me back too bad while the that charger goes to the shop.
    3 points
  2. Back in the good old days( pre Amtrak HEP ) railroad cars used 32, 64, or 110 VDC to run the cars A/C. When Head End Power became available and the cables mandated for any cars used on Amtrak trains, most owners converted to 230 VAC 3 phase units. From 1951 to about 1960, the crew car for the communications crew of the Communication Car, Presidential had ice bunker A/C cooling with just 32VDC fans and pumps ( same as would be found in the Presidential Pullman ) but had 32VDC freezers and refrigerator. The Communications car itself had 32VDC A/C. It needed it as just the lights in the Comm room would generate a lot of heat. And then you had the two transmitters and the receivers in the car. Those transmitters generated a lot of heat as they were tube type units. Those same units however were still in use into the 90s as they were the only things that could be guarantied to work under many conditions. So while the RRs switched to AC A/C units, many are learning of the benefits of having DC units. Thing is, I don't know of any that are sealed units. All were motor and compressor units which sooner or later will leak Freon at the seal of the shaft.
    3 points
  3. My 2 cents: There's nothing like the despair of watching everything go up in smoke without a kill switch. I had a Morningstar Tristar TS-MPPT-60 blow out (kamikaze style--literally--it blew up 3 seconds after I sent a MODBUS "hardware reset" command apparently one time too many)...and I am SO glad that I had tandem breakers on it (one on solar, one on battery, mechanically linked together), as the breakers tripped simultaneously with the bright orange flash from the MPPT. Was trialing some Epever 8420AN charge controllers last year, and had my wife keep an eye on the system the first few days. Inverter alarm went off a few times (battery overvoltage...didn't have the MPPTs set right), and when the alarm went off, it was super easy for me to tell her to just flip the 2-pole MPPT breakers off...I'd figure it out when I got back home 6 hours later. Personally, I'd much rather blow up an MPPT...than burn my entire house down. One's a LOT cheaper to replace 😉. Obviously, you're personally more than welcome to design your system as to what you personally prefer--but just from a simple safety perspective, I will ALWAYS strongly recommend properly rated breakers (or fuses if you must!) on ALL connections to an off-grid battery bank. Not only does it making it considerably easier to shut a part of the system off for repair (if needed), but also simply so there's a very quick and safe way to immediately stop power flow in an emergency...without running out to the shed to try to find that pair of bolt cutters you used 3 years ago. Or worse, trying to borrow one from a firefighter.
    2 points
  4. Results are in: it had to be that stupid NEG wire to the control board. Autopsy results show the classic signature of a bad connection on the NEG post: the main power supply chip is blown. Our mistake. Will replace the control board and get it sent back out to you...but that connection will be SOLDERED this time! (And on all inverters going out.)
    2 points
  5. React is a nice idea but I think I'll be dead from old age before they get to a release version and TBH WINE on *nix will meet most people's needs to run a Windows program without Windows. IMO Microsoft releasing the source code for anything close to a current version of Windows would only happen just before they drop Windows. perhaps moving to a compatibility layer in linux etc. 'Next' versions of Windows aren't built in a vacuum. It's an evolutionary process rather than revolutionary, to the point where a vulnerability found in a current version of Windows has a pretty high chance of existing in a discontinued version if that vulnerability isn't in some truly new thing that didn't exist in any form in the old version. Releasing, say, Windows NT3.1 source code would still give away far too many secrets, methods and concepts that exist today in Windows 10.
    2 points
  6. From what I've seen even the elcheapo chinese HF inverters have internal fuses. Sure there's still scope for a wiring fault inside the inverter between the DC terminals and the fuse on the PCB but I think you are pretty safe there. Personally I wouldn't run without protection between the busbar and inverter, and at the busbar end of the wire too. Accidentally shorting the leads with a wrench while fitting to the inverter may require a change of underware and a new set of eyes.
    2 points
  7. In between the ice bunker designs and the DC units was a third type that use pumps and fans. It was steam ejector A/C. Where the steam drew a vacuum on a water tank and the evaporation/boiling of the water gave up the heat. The chilled water then, like in the ice bunker style was pumped up to the radiator unit in the ceiling where the fan blew air into the rest of the car. Ice Bunker A/C was very good at cooling a car down quick as by the time the water had made two passes in the system it had cooled down to 34°. It could take a car in 90° temps inside and out and cool it to 70° in about 15 minutes. It also was very good at pulling the humidity out of the air such that the unit needed two 3/4" drains to dump it. Excess water to the needs of the system was dumped automatically when it was was coming back from the coil before being pumped over the ice again. The units were rated at 2 tons per day and the bunkers held 1400 pounds at a time each. The steam vacuum systems required add in water all the time to make up for the use. So it came out of the cars water tanks. Almost all of the cars built in the 40s had Ice bunker A/C while late in the 40s they started the switch to mechanical A/C. In some cases, simply sliding units into the bunkers to replace the ice and still using the rest of the systems already in use. All of the units used Freon 12. Cars that ran in the SW of the US had started using DC A/C in the middle 1930s. The car my friend had was built in 1936 for the Santa Fe Railroad and had DC A/C. It got AC A/C when it was rebuilt to meet Amtrak requirements in 1994-96. It is the oldest Stainless Steel car that meets those specs and one of the earliest Stainless cars that were interchange capable instead of units like the tilt trains are.
    2 points
  8. UPDATE: I put some code together implementing mDNS and a local webserver to host a dynamically generated JSON file, and a simple webpage (to read said file)...and it worked perfectly the first time. You can change the mDNS name to pretty much anything you want from the WiFi config page. (This will all be coming out in firmware version 1.1r3.) Only part I haven't fully worked out is how to control the inverter from the local server (on/off/config, etc.) It is very easy to handle HTTP POST (form submit, etc.) requests, though I'm not sure what's going to be ideal.
    2 points
  9. Having a standalone system for storing and monitoring all of the data from the inverter like a raspberry pi or similar would be a far better solution than putting any more thinking sand into the inverter as it has one major job and it needs to do it well. I like the idea that Sid and others have discussed about having one centralized monitoring and logging system that puts all the data together. That device could host an encrypted webserver page so that all of your data is at your fingertips without the inverter, charge controllers home energy monitor or anything else in the system relying on it to perform their function. Even if that system is a low power computer running a full fat desktop OS.
    2 points
  10. My entire 12kw array is comprised of secondhand panels (more or less). No issues so far. First panels (SolarWorld SW245) were from a retired solar farm...they performed above expectations. Remaining panels were from a solar farm that encountered severe damage during installation (unexpected windstorm), so they're technically pretty new. No issues there, if you discount bent frames 😉. As long as you get a significant discount on secondhand "used" panels, I would say "go for it." Over time, the solar panels' output wattage will slowly decrease, but this will be characterized in the specification sheet for the panels.
    2 points
  11. GS Inverters, so tough that even UPS can't break 'em. Please send payment for use of slogan to TheButcher c/o genetrysolar forum 😉
    2 points
  12. Your latest video about energy peovider is the best about the lies that utility advertise . Grid tie Solar install by utility is not free in the long run . They install smart meter to check for illegal off grid in the city . I cut my utility bill in half by using the powerjack inverter and they change the smart meter . 6 months later they change the smart meter again . The last time the utility took my service entrance box (outside own by utility) apart to inspect for solar or generator transfer switch when I am not home but there is none . You are a brave man to talk and thank you .
    1 point
  13. I have owned my house for about 5 years now however my grandmother was living in the house up until her passing in the spring of last year (not covid-19) and after she passed I basically put the house into mothballs while the family had time to go through things and start cleaning the place out. after about 2 months of the power bill going from about $90 per month to around $25 per month the power company sent an employee to come out and inspect the meter. I happen to be in the house at the time and I went and talked to them. They explained that they noticed I was abruptly using less power and they thought the meter was possibly faulty and explained the situation and they made note of the change on my account. At the time I also told them I wasn't going to be using as much electricity as I am at work sometimes 16-20 hours a day as a teacher so I am not home as much to use electricity. Since then my bill has been averaging $35-50 per month and I have been slowly weening the house off of the grid as I move circuits from one panel to the other. I don't ever plan to disconnect from the grid but I do want to keep the usage very low.
    1 point
  14. Well, turning off the local host well thats a video call lol. I'm guessing around maybe 5 more hourse on the last print that is running, don't want to stop on it since its one of those prints that has about 30 parts on one print bed. My big production printer took a dump and the power supply went out, which isn't a surprise so got another printer on the way to replace it and going to buy a bigger power supply to upgrade the other printer since the one it comes with is under powered to begain with, dang cheap idiots. . put a 350w on a device that needs 450w to run at 24v, real smart. Hmmm didn't think about it, I could run those printers off of my battery bank. wow, would save on power if I did that. . .
    1 point
  15. Well, Happy to say I have ran my house off of the two gs inverters with no issue after the Master GS inverter had a loose wire inside and went up. Sent it to Sean in in a week had it back on my wall and after wireing everything back up turned everything 240v off my panel I ran my house off of both gs inverters with no issue what so ever. Will be posting a video shortly of how things are working.
    1 point
  16. The upgrade board arrived. Whole Board Driver board. Here's the control 'panel'. The board has three open 10pin sockets, and the wire harness has two 10pin plugs. I do not know what goes where. I'm not sure ehe rainbow colored ribbon will be long enough to plug into the 'sub-board'. My existing ribbon is much longer. You can also see the two thermistors. As for the control board, I'm going to need to drill some holes and nibble the square. I will also need some standoffs - preferably plastic. I believe the standing rotary switch is the Charge Rate Switch. I have know idea what the others do. I think these go the fans ??? Here's the charger version Thar be the underbelly of the beast.
    1 point
  17. Firstly, PJ reverses "input" and "output" on the transformer...as far as I'm concerned, the "input" is the FET side, and the "output" is the AC high voltage side. PJ nomenclature is reversed from this. I am assuming from "15kw" that the battery voltage is 48v...all numbers from here on out assume the same. 2) PJ spec is 36vAC primary, 230vAC secondary. This provides very little headroom for regulation before the wave starts to saturate. GS units currently run 32vAC primary, 240vAC secondary; I'd still like to reduce the primary voltage for a bit more headroom. HOWEVER, read farther on... 1) I am presuming this is a stock PJ control board (with upgraded CPU firmware)...if so, I would have to see a photo of the output board to know whether the center tap is required or not. The large PJ inverters (in my experience) seem to regulate from one 120v phase...meaning that if you remove the center tap, the inverter will either give you 120vAC out (of your 240vAC transformer) OR fail to be able to regulate voltage (which may blow FETs). One reason that PJ runs such a shallow transformer ratio, is because the LF Driver is mismatched and imbalanced. The more of a square wave output the inverter produces, "surprisingly" the cooler the FETs are (because they aren't switching on/off at the SPWM carrier frequency). Using a steeper transformer ratio (i.e. lower primary voltage) forces the FETs to run more of the wave in the SPWM region--and "strangely" they get a lot hotter. This is because of the mismatched and imbalanced LF Driver. Your mileage may vary. Running a very low primary voltage starts to cause problems with EMI and resultant signal crosstalk on the FET control cable (rainbow ribbon cable). Regardless of that, the signal switching crosstalk starts to reach fatal levels much past 6kw (at least in our experience with GS control boards with properly matched stronger drivers)...causing the FETs to run very hot. In significantly higher loads, the FETs will blow immediately due to this crosstalk. These issues are in part why we have decided to no longer promote/support upgrading PJ inverters. Because by the time you replace everything that's being problematic, you basically end up at exactly the same place you'd be if you had started from the ground up with a completely different design. Which is pretty much where we are at with Genetry Solar right now (prototype testing).
    1 point
  18. I would normally want the BMS to disconnect as a last resort but I have found that at least with the MSB charge controllers I would end up in a short cycling situation as TheButcher is describing and with a MOSFET based BMS like I am using that is not much of an issue as it is only disconnecting in the charge direction but the BMS is still connected in the discharge direction. If the MOSFETs in the BMS fail short the solar charge controller will disconnect charging. The capacitors would go on the DC side if I decide to go that route. I originally ordered the Fullriver cells from "athomemarket" which I am pretty sure is "dougdeals" and "CDN Systems LLC"
    1 point
  19. I started noticing the output frequency droop after you had me update from the original firmware I believe since I have one of the early air shipped units. I didn't realize I could turn that off so I will have to go in and do that at some point. Basically, didn't want to fix what isn't broke and mess something up. I have the inverter output connected directly to a secondary critical loads panel that is not neutral ground tied. The main panel is neutral ground bonded but I have all of the circuits in the critical loads panel Line and Neutral isolated from the main except for a 6 gauge ground bonding the ground busbar of the 2 panels. As well as the 2 panels being physically bonded with conduit. I am aware of the back feed potential but I am assuming it should be ok with the secondary panel having a non bonded neutral. Unless power can go in on the ground terminal of the inverter which is bonded to the entire ground system.
    1 point
  20. and Yes I had fuses on the main wire going to the gs inverters when this happen. Was running my house, well the water heater then the drier, in 10 seconds the power went off, and it smell like burning rubber coming from the master, and it was dead as a door nail, while the slave just flash green waiting to get a signel from the master which took a dump. So if you get a gs inverter and UPS dropped it, be warn. . the known issue will be fixed on all gs inverters going out. But, lets just say that is why my washer machine was acting like a crazy mind. on the Slave inverter I've been washing cloths running dish washer cooking pizza, running microwave with no issue.
    1 point
  21. Right, as long as you got a rated breaker per battery bank going to a bus bar then y our good, you don't need one from bus bar to inverter main line. my bms are 100a rated, I use 150a breakers bussmann breakers now since theya re cheap and are so far doing good. Means more breakers, but if something goes wrong such as over amping on one battery bank it will trip saving any issue with melting wires and such. I've already had one battery went up, luckly the case smoother it out, due to the inverter yanking over 279a for a 100a bms, it litterly melted and flash vaper the nickle stirps I had holding the eletric wire to the terminal. Now I'm soldering to remove that weak link and as well installing breakers at the postive side going to the bus bar to prevent that from happening again. I'm learning as I go and glad that Sid and others are helping along the way.
    1 point
  22. are you putting a breaker between the inverter and the battery bank? My battery banks are 48v I use 300 amp breaker between the battery bank and inverter . I use 300 amp breaker between each battery banks . Safe load for my 15kw PS inverter is 6000 watts with 300 amps breaker . I would not straight wire without any fuse or breaker as it is too dangerous . I trip many 300 amps breaker with inductive surge and fire is a real possibilty .
    1 point
  23. Well, I hav'ta admit, it's kinda hard to frame a broken pile of glass 🤣.
    1 point
  24. Feel free to move this thread to the u-power section if you want. Lol that's what showed up. Anyway, it showed up in great condition, despite my concern with the damaged box it arrived in lol Anything jump out at you off the hop? Just came back here to read where that led is again. Going to read back, then remove it lol I also see an extra fan header so I'll add some more cooling by the transformer soon too. Oh wait... This is a version 11 board. Led still in same place?
    1 point
  25. We're still trying to work out the kinks with parallel mode before releasing the update. It works fairly well right now, but can work better.
    1 point
  26. Should just be the existing choke. PJ just has one full turn around the choke...and the wires are usually long enough to force a second turn around the same choke. Amazing how much that helps. After reading comments and threads on TheBackshed.com, I personally bought a larger ferrite core ("split bobbin")...but did not find any significant gain over using it vs the stock PJ toroid choke. Here's a photo of an inverter on my test bench with 2 full turns around the stock ferrite core. Your inverter will have at least one of these, as you'll see an easy 5A+ no-load current without one. PJ only does 1 full turn, which reduces no-load to ~1.5A. You should be able to get just under 1A with 2 full turns.
    1 point
  27. This thread will house all the info regarding our parallel mode. This mode allows you to string together multiple inverters to share the same load. The pros currently being that you can effectively double or triple the output or more depending on how many you string together. We have yet to determine factors like efficiency or surge capabilities in this mode as it is still being tested and tweaked for optimal performance. 'Split Sync' would be the preferred method with running no more than 2 inverters. This thread will be updated as more info comes along such as testing results and how to hook up. Those of you waiting on your daisy inverters should see them popping in the mail soon here.
    1 point
  28. 15K 3950 thermistor. Not the super easiest to find, but that's the spec.
    1 point
  29. Considering that the majority of all computer systems and SOC devices throughout the world, that use a base operating system, are running either a customized flavor of GNU-Linux or BSD, I would say that answers the question of which is better. The only reason people still use windows is because of market share for desktop operating systems. People are used to windows, or they use it for work and can't be bothered to learn a whole new OS even if it would end up being better. Windows 10 isn't terrible once you spend the 1-2 hours it generally takes after a fresh install to get rid of all of the advertising, telemetry/tracking junk, risky/unneeded services and all the bloat that is not needed that M$ feels they need to shove down our throats. Linux and BSD have the problem of not having enough adoption/market share on the desktop to force more software and hardware companies to release versions of their software and drivers for Linux and BSD. If you have an android based device or a Chromebook, then you are using Google's customized version of Linux. If you are using an iOS device or OSX then you are using Crapple's customized version of a BSD based OS. Most home WIFI routers also run a stripped down flavor of Linux or BSD.
    1 point
  30. Always interesting to see how things were done in another country. Long haul passenger trains in my state, QLD Australia, weren't air-conditioned at all until 1953 when a new set of diesel hauled trains replaced the old steam hauled wooden carriage trains that only had fans. The new train had a dedicated generator car that provided 240/415 50Hz AC. That set ran until 2014 when they were replaced by a tilt train (diesel and electric versions depending on where in the state it runs) that is permitted to run up to 160km/h on QLD's narrow gauge track.
    1 point
  31. I plan to use my 14000btu portable AC to directly cool your 12000 watt GS inverter in patio outside and use the GS inverter to run the 4 ton house AC 240 vac directly . The temperature in the patio now is 102 degree and the PS inverter will only run 1 hour and shut down . No way to cool the PS inverter but wait 2 hours for the ASL 9 transformer to cool down .
    1 point
  32. First off, you need to find the (rather large) TO-247 main transistor. It's about 5/8" wide by 3/4" tall; at the top center of this device is the heatsink mounting hole (roughly 4mm diameter). The PCB is flat-level with the top of the main transistor if held right-side up, transistor mounting hole "12 o'clock". Note that the PCB does not extend all the way to the top of the transistor. The LCD is at the 6 o'clock end of the PCB, mounted on top of the PCB. (The MCU is below the LCD and can't be felt.) With the transistor mounting hole at 12 o'clock, the PCB directly to the left of the transistor (9 o'clock) is battery cell positive, and the PCB directly to the right (3 o'clock) is battery cell negative. (There are no parts on these "legs" of PCB.) If you feel a row of pads, that's the underside of the PCB, and that's the LCD's leads. Yes, that's the main transistor. Entire back needs to contact a large heatsink--but be electrically isolated if more than one balancer is on the heatsink. All of the current run of balance shunts have LCDs.
    1 point
  33. Just ran across a seller with 40+ new 250 amp 80v dc breakers on ebay for $50. A steal for anyone that might be needing something that big. I hope that's big enough to handle the new Genetry coming in. https://www.ebay.com/itm/293578382765?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649
    1 point
  34. The terminals? It's the same as the others. At least the 40A (v117) and 60A (v119) units I have here are identical on the terminal strip. PV+PV+, PV-PV-, BAT+BAT+, BAT-BAT-, OUT+, OUT-
    1 point
  35. Two possible problems with 2 possible solutions 😉. If this was one of the earlier inverters going out, the AC input config may not have been set up right--in which case the AC Input entry on the LCD won't register anything, no matter what power you put into the inverter. (Internal solder jumper wasn't set.) Please note that we're aware of an issue with the GS AC input...frankly, it's based off the PJ circuit with just a single relay on L1. Well, turns out that most people using the AC input want to connect it to the grid/breaker panels--which thanks to the UL ground-neutral bonding requirement, pretty well ends up back-powering the inverter even when the relay is off. (This will be fixed on Rev. C.) WiFi...I am assuming it just won't connect? Or does it not stay connected? Just discovered a random reconnection issue with the WiFi on a certain inverter this week--was able to fix the bug via firmware update, and now it quickly reconnects to WiFi if it loses connection for whatever reason. Might also be affecting your inverter if it connects to WiFi when you set it up the first time (from the generated WiFi config page)...then ends up disconnected and stays that way. If so, this will be fixed on 1.1r3, which I hope to release sometime next week (have another few bugs to track down + new features to tinker with).
    1 point
  36. The point of grounding the entire PV array is not directly for lightning and the required grounding wire gauge will likely never handle the instantaneous current of a direct lightning strike though it may take a good portion of it to ground. The reason for bonding or grounding a PV array is to ensure that any charge accumulation on the array makes its way safely to ground while providing a way to ensure the potential between the racking, modules, and charge controllers never exceeds the max rated system voltage. If it ever does due to hardware failure, tracking, corrosion, or short and becomes energized, that charge has a way to go safely to ground to prevent the chance that the system may be floating at several hundreds or even thousands of volts and create a lethal shock hazard. Lightning rods are installed on high structures to prevent a lightning strike by allowing the accumulated charge between the earth and the atmosphere (charged clouds and ionized air) a low resistance path to equalize before a lightning strike occurs lowering the potential and reducing the chances of a strike from taking place. So the intent is that they will not be struck by lightning as they are preventing it by allowing the charge differential to equalize. If the charge buildup is happening faster than the rate at which it can be dissipated through the lightning protection system then you still have the potential for lightning to strike but at least it might cause less heat damage on it's way to the ground since you are providing it a low resistance path to ground. If your array does take a direct lightning strike, you will likely be replacing/repairing some things to bring everything back to working order but proper grounding helps reduce the risk and helps keep the entire system at or near the same potential.
    1 point
  37. I think there are one way breakers and bi way breakers. a Fuse is so much easier, it don't matter, either way, your going to blow it anyhow lol.
    1 point
  38. Didn't mean to cause you panic; the manufacturer's rated lifetime is an absolute worst-case scenario: running the capacitor at the maximum rated temp (often 105C--closer to 220F), maximum voltage, AND maximum ripple current. If the cap is at none of these max ratings, they can often live for years without issues. My introduction to the damaging effects of ripple current were when I overheated and caused a 100uF 400v electrolytic cap to pretty well explode into a huge cloud of smoke. I had been running it at 50vDC, but with a PWM "brake" on a motor. Needed the cap to suppress the motor's splash to save the FET--but the 60Hz short-circuit PWM pulses meant immense ripple current. Took roughly 20 minutes of tests before the cap blew up. PJ DID have a rash of bad caps about a year ago--they switched suppliers, and got rebranded garbage. Took 'em a few months to realize that the caps were junk, and they went back to the old supplier. Apart from that, we aren't aware of any undue garbage caps in PJ inverters. My house inverter is just over 3 years old, still sporting the original FETs and caps (that and the chassis are about all that's original right now, hahaha!), no issues. If the caps aren't swelling/bulging, you're probably just fine.
    1 point
  39. No. Same design flaws in each. Personally, I have a hard time seeing the smaller mainboards being able to handle 600A without melting. Yeah, smaller heatsinks and all... Not entirely sure; there's probably mathematics to figure this out though. Basically, the caps main purpose is to suppress inductive oscillations in the battery cables / wiring. Without them, the SPWM switching of the FETs will turn the battery cables into inductors--very quickly blowing the FETs to smithereens. However, this power filtration comes at a cost: electrolytic capacitors have a maximum ripple current (a factor of the ESR and heat dissipation ability)...which if their ripple current is exceeded, they will overheat and fail. (Let's not mention that most electrolytic caps are rated for a lifetime of only 2,000 hours--3 months--at full rated voltage, temperature, and ripple current.) Adding more capacitors divides the ripple current out...the challenge is knowing how much ripple current there is, and what the caps are rated for. In short: the danger of too-few (or junk) caps is that they'll overheat and fail. Or not be able to squelch damaging oscillations in the battery wires (in which case the FETs would fail), etc.
    1 point
  40. Huh, Sean was talking about the split phase on the video and saying use 6 gauge wire? Oy, that is one thick wire if that is the case, I'm useing two 10 if they heat up at all then I'll go down but, geesh 6 wow, I hate to know that price for that size. just for 15ft of 10/3 was nearly $60 bucks.
    1 point
  41. Sean has talked in videos about "sync issues" with twin mainboards, etc.--well, let's just say that none of that is electrically possible. The 2 connectors on the control board are hardwired together, so both mainboards are getting identical signals. What CAN happen is...with two mainboards, now the (already) overloaded LF Driver has twice as much work. With it struggling to turn FETs on and off quickly enough, the FETs end up spending a lot more time in their resistive range (potentially also encountering cross-conduction or shoot-through)--causing a LOT more heat. Secondly, they usually use a ridiculously long ribbon cable on the 2nd mainboard (well, both for that matter)...which adds considerable inductive ring and resistance to the already-too-weak signals. It's just a rash of poor design.
    1 point
  42. No, they're in the ordering cart. Working on refining the designs, making sure I've gotten them as good as I can before paying the big bucks to get them ordered. Looks like I'll need to add at least 1 more design to the cart--technically should add 2, though....make that 11 designs.
    1 point
  43. A large number of appliances with PFC "universal" input voltage range often accept a large frequency variation as well--as they don't care about it too much. Often 80-265v and 40-70Hz. A frequency shift will definitely affect older appliances with synchronous motors, etc.--but most newer digital appliances just rectify the AC into DC anyhow, so you could literally run them on 180vDC if you wanted to (non-PFC though) We'll figure it out.
    1 point
  44. Haven't bought any yet, though the price is pretty tempting. If others have bought them and can confirm that they're good for the price/quality, etc., we'll soon be doing FCL (full container load) shipments of inverters, and could easily throw a couple pallets of LiFePo4 batteries in the container. Price doesn't change by weight, so once the container is paid for, pretty much anything can go in it. Might be worthwhile...
    1 point
  45. The code requires systems operating above 50 V nominal to be grounded. A 48 V battery system doesn't HAVE to be grounded. But a 90 VDC PV system would. Grounding a system like that would automatically tie the AC and DC sides together. In a contracted system, that is, one not likely to be tinkered with by the customer, blow ups only happen from failed components of lightning. But I have a feeling systems represented on this forum probably blow up weekly from wandering screw drivers🤣. The pic is just one way it could be done. I hope it is clear enough.
    1 point
  46. Can you sketch a diagram of the layout? I read it like the GFCI is basically the end of the chain and it is tripping from some upstream problem... Which isn't how GFCIs work. The only time I've seen that was from dirty power or RF interference. Fun side story: Remember Nextel and Direct Connect from the first decade of the 2000s? Cellphones with walkie talkies basically. I was in a medical facility trouble shooting something. I opened a breaker panel full of GFCI breakers and pulled out my phone to radio someone. As soon as I hit the button to talk, all the GFCI breakers tripped. 20+ breakers tripping simultaneously is an event to behold. I was thrilled that I discovered something neat, but the facility was none too happy with this blackout!
    1 point
  47. They can be used when first starting to build a tower to get the first unit up. The gin pole has to sit higher than the unit to be installed with the block and tackle needing to also be included in the height. Once the first section is up, the gin pole goes up to the top of the first section and lifts the second one up. Gin pole is normally guy wired so that it cannot move sideways. The US Army on the generator cars they built for the USAF used a winch on the braced gin pole to raise the mast for the connection to the 3 phase power lines. You could barely lift the gin pole into place and the mast was impossible to raise any other way. All of it stowed in a box on the roof of the car. You can see the bottom of the Gin Pole and mast in this picture. http://rr-fallenflags.org/steamtown/gcrm89441amh.jpg
    1 point
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