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  1. Have a lot going on, but hopefully I'll soon be able to get back to the firmware and get an update with battery charging enabled + misc bugfixes. Yes, the WiFi board gives a LOT more info into the inverter's internal workings, that was the point πŸ˜‰.
    2 points
  2. Any glue that isn't acidic / chemically unstable should be fine--you don't want it to eat the enamel off of the transformer wire. (Pretty sure Sean uses regular hot glue.) A favorite trick of mine is to try to slide it under some windings.
    1 point
  3. Welcome, and thanks for the overview. Didn't know that wind turbine propeller could be used as a coat rack, haha πŸ˜‰... How's the Leaf pack stacking up? Any BMS/balancing system?
    1 point
  4. maybe not talking about the exact same thing? Another youtube by a electrical engineer EEVblog 1406 - DC Circuit Transients Fundamentals explain how bad an inductive load can be on the DC side . The battery DC input wire of the inverter go directly to the positive of the capacitor and the ripple on the capacitor will destroy the capacitor over time as mention in this forum . I put choke on the positive input like in the picture so now the circuit is a LC circuit . The choke will reduce the ripple on the capacitor and the capacitor will last a little longer running the heavy inductive load of the heat pump . The surge is so bad on the capacitor that the capacitor burn and the solder melted and the capacitor come loose . That why I need the 12kw GS next year . The DC choke also reduce the standby wattage to almost nothing .
    1 point
  5. the idea of the choke is to lessen the flyback from surges on heavy loads, but that would be on the ac side or the ac output from the inverter ..... correct Yes . If you open the transformer box there is a choke or 2 chokes on the AC side . I have 2 chokes outside the box on the DC pos and DC neg wires . When a heavy load like a heat pump start there is a huge surge on the AC side which cause a big drain on the DC side and the choke soften the huge inrush from the battery . People on youtube say DC choke do nothing which is true but nobody run a 4 ton heat pump on a powerjack either . I have to keep my battery voltage 61 volt to run inductive load that why I use the dangerous lithium ion electric car battery 16s . Those battery dump 300 amps in millisecond and the temperature of the transformer and moffet jump up fast .
    1 point
  6. Sorry for the lack of communication. There was an unexpected manufacturing change in the last batch of inverters...considerably increasing the size of the transformer hold-down bracket. That by itself wasn't a bad idea EXCEPT that it considerably reduces the airflow across the transformer. Which...reduces the maximum continuous load--to less than 6kw. (Sean ran load tests several days ago.) The manufacturer will be express shipping us a full set of replacement transformer brackets as per the original specification. I'd expect a video about this sometime soon. Split-phase is standard; Rev. C boards I alas have still not ordered. Found that my preferred PCB company has serious problems with maintaining SMT assembly item stocks...so I will have to find a different company. Been busy working on a big project for a friend, so unfortunately the GS stuff has been slipping a bit on my plate...
    1 point
  7. Right now they claim the LiFePO4 is the safest battery formula. I have 2 of the LiFePo4 batteries fully assembled and running for about 10 months 2p8S 24-volts each (13926.4Wh each); and I am doing more assembly on the larger 4P8S 32 cell 24-volt battery (27,852.8Wh). I have to make some support structures for the busbar and heavy cables and it looks like the only logical place is a stand/shelf for the heavy 3 piece 15,000 watt 24-volt inverter is going to be above the 32 cell Lishen battery build. I have to make it all sturdy. many trips back and forth to get boards cut to size out in the shop. etc. slow but sure.. it always an amazingly slow process trying to make things fit in an orderly fashion. Even the cell phone camera had a bunch of things that made the pictures look black and white, which I did not want, I want the color coding to be more obvious in the photos. I send the cell phone photos over gmail so i can add to my posts. learn by ones' mistakes -- I guess. 😎 Sean really needs a larger battery bank to run the inverters. Brand new LiFePO4 cells from China now have a 6000 cycle claim at which time they are supposed to be at 80 percent of new capacity.... that is like 16 years or more. then a newer technology will be out there; if one can keep the greedy corporate types from hoarding the technology from the common folks.πŸ™ƒ A powersupply that does not mimic real life battery power???? I do not run my inverters from the grid --- they are all off-grid >>>> that's the whole point of an inverter in my mind. independence and self-sufficiency is the goal... The Electrodacus SBMS0 will control the Electrodacus DSSR20's so the batteries will not get overcharged. no need for cell balancers as the SBMS0 does the cell balancing as the cells are being charged. hopefulluy the PowerJack LF PSW SP inverters will survive the winter heating season demands, so I do not have to spend so much on propane. the inverters seem to be my weak link at the moment. but i have not put them to heavy use yet... just speculation at this point.😎 More later!
    1 point
  8. If you have 110v coming out of the AC Input terminal, something is seriously miswired; factory or otherwise. I don't think your problem is FETs, driver board, or anything of that sort. I would suspect a bad connection somewhere between the secondary (high voltage) side of the transformer, and the battery terminals. Try wiggling the transformer connection wires, or pull the white covers back from over the crimps. Are the crimped transformer wire ends loose / poorly connecting? Are the screw terminals on the PCB loose? Can you move the ring terminal back and forth while the screw is tightened? (They've had issues with the screws being too long--they'll be tight but not actually holding the ring terminal.) In short: the inverter can regulate output voltage at no load. As soon as you put a load on it, the regulation goes wonky--this to me sounds like the regulator is not seeing any AC output voltage as soon as you put a load on it. The video showed your tool barely moving as the inverter is "warping" the drive signals. If there was a solid connection, I'd expect that tool to be racing with the transformer, as the output AC voltage ramps from 0 to likely past 300vAC each time it "warps". If it was a FET drive issue, you wouldn't hear the sound from the transformer OR the FETs would just blow up. (sorry, thought I posted this last night!)
    1 point
  9. 40 250 watt solar panels arrived on 2 pallets by truck today (10,000 watts more solar panels. so lots to do before winter sets in too hard. WOW amazing . Sean should do what you do . LG pouch battery is too hot and dangerous .
    1 point
  10. well i hope i get some dependable ones(Delta fans) . i hate to be a guineypig on everything. i have redundant inverters just in case but hope the delta fans dont take a big smelly dump on me. i did hook up the negative to the wrong color busbar last night . found it this mornining. i like the negative to be black as much as possible and the positive to be red on the DC side of things..check check and tripple check all wires before the all is hooked up. .. i don't want the smoke to come out and have it be a silly error because one was in a hurry or the light and glasses weren't working good.. so ignore the previous picture i changed it out. will update more later. i think the 24-volt inverter is going on a shelf above the 32 cell LiFePO4 battery. need more space . 40 250 watt solar panels arrived on 2 pallets by truck today (10,000 watts more solar panels. so lots to do before winter sets in too hard. again thanks for all the suggestions and warnings..... still learning... 😎 today I'm building a mount for the busbars, class t fuse, and the shelf for the 3 piece SS 15,000 watt psw lf sp inverter to sit on a bit today. slow but sure. I plan to put more load on the 15000 24-volt inverter with the 27,852.8Wh LiFePO4 battery build. All is being done off-grid. seen a big fat wood chuck this morning. seems like he/she likes to he the pears off the ground but digs lots of holes.
    1 point
  11. ok thanks for the reply... i am trying to understand the inverter capability more, in relation to my new 32 cell 25.6 nominal volt LiFePO4 battery. i have it assembled now and the voltage is 27.35 (not yet hooked to the inverter). i have to make the cables to the busbar negatives and cables to the busbar positives. also i will make 4/0 cables from the bus bar to the inverter and add in a 400 amp class T fuse on the positive cable between the busbar and inverter. i see they are now selling a choke for large loads on the inverter such as motors and such to help protect the mosfets. A bandaid?? πŸ€” the 272Ah 32 lishen 3.2-volt LiFePO4 cells are configured in an 4P8S configuration and will have at least 1088Ah as they are said to have over 280Ah. 3.2volts X8cell = 25.6 volts nominal 25.6 nominal volts x 272 Ah per cell = 6963.2 Wh 6963.2 Wh X 4 (as there are 4 in parallel) = 27,852.8 Wh battery. 😎 i do not think the amperage loss will be much of an issue. but i am not sure of all the small details as i am not an electrical engineer. any explantion is always appreciated!! here is a picture of the 32 cell 4P8S battery I connected yesterday. the positive is on the right end and the negaative is on the left end. the parallel connections were made 1st, then the series connections. it was at 27.35 volts yesterday at about 5pm. i had to put extensions on the multimeter leads to measure the positive and negative on the 1st row to 8th row as it ia about 63 inches long.
    1 point
  12. Today's the day to see if I have the 12kw design far enough along to make it work...fingers crossed it'll be good! 6kw inverters are back in stock as of a few days ago.
    1 point
  13. The inverters aren't all sold (to my knowledge!), so you definitely should be on this batch.
    1 point
  14. We didn't replace a filter on "The Blind Wolf's" inverter, but doubling the existing AC filtration should definitely help with washing machine compatibility. Surge is limited by the transformer; the 6kw inverters seem to be able to run an 18kw surge...though I'm not about to start emblazoning that on literature without knowing exactly what it can do. (Do know that it can't start Sean's big A/C with the 28kw surge rating.) Due to the transformer / FET ratings working out quite nicely, we have never had a 6kw inverter failure from a surge/overload condition.
    1 point
  15. Yup, no "BMS" battery disconnect. Just breakers and balancers + settings.
    1 point
  16. No, the FETs won't blow...but the transformer will overheat, and the internal chassis wiring isn't rated for more than the design spec 25A. The FETs in a 6kw inverter @ 48v can handle roughly 30kw with a conservative rating. FETs aren't the limit.
    1 point
  17. If you're shorting the thermostat directly with a screwdriver and the fan doesn't run, then there must be a problem further upstream where the fan connects to the battery.
    1 point
  18. the fan stopped turning on, I tested it directly with the batteries and it worked, maybe it is the thermostat The fan will always turn on at 39 degree C . Use a infrared thermoniter gauge to see if fan turn on . If not then shut off the inverter and get a car toggle switch to manually turn on the fan . I use a switch to keep the fan always on for my inverter .
    1 point
  19. what is the purpose of the "power sav" position The power sav is the OFF position of the switch and will never power anything . Without choke the inverter may use 50 wall just to keep itself power on with no load . With the switch in power sav the inverter my use 10 wall with no load and make your battery last a tiny bit longer . I never use power sav because I have 40 thousand wh lithium ion battery at 60 v .
    1 point
  20. Grid tie without backfeeding is known as "zero export." Not sure how sensitive the "smart meter" is...as while it's possible for a Rev. C control board to regulate the input AC current to zero (or as close as practically possible)...if there's a sudden shift in the load, a bit of power will slip through one way or the other until the inverter regulator adjusts. GS inverters have automatic restart settings for battery UVP/OVP protection (as well as overload / overheat). A much simpler and easier method to handle grid backup is to use the inverter in normal operation mode with AC input & ATS. You can configure the ATS on and ATS off voltage threshold settings; if the battery gets too low, the inverter will automatically (sync and) switch to the AC grid. (Rev. C will be able to do a perfectly seamless transition to the grid.) If the inverter runs on the grid all night, once the solar chargers charge the batteries back up and reach the ATS "off" threshold, the inverter can drop back to battery-powered operation. (Note that even on Rev. C, this may have a slight 1-3 cycle "glitch"). You can also specify a separate charge trigger threshold (as well as enable/disable) for battery charge from the grid if desired.
    1 point
  21. At no load, 45.25v is the theoretical minimum for a pure sine wave, yes. Under load, this minimum voltage requirement will rise. Yes, because of the dual ferrite chokes on the transformer primary lines. Otherwise it'd start to struggle pretty badly up there.
    1 point
  22. Here I will disagree. What is being changed is the transformer ratio, regardless of whether the turns are added to the secondary, or removed from the primary. There is a difference however; adding more turns to the secondary uses more wire, which is why it generally isn't done. It does decrease the turns/volt core voltage, which may hypothetically provide more safety range before core saturation (which is when FETs go kaboom.) However, removing turns from the primary will increase the turns/volt (if driven to the same AC input voltage)...and if this exceeds the transformer core's saturation voltage, the no-load current will start to rise (as well as transformer heat), AND reduced efficiency. Betcha this is due to a lack of ferrite chokes on the transformer primary wires. These chokes serve to absorb the 24KHz SPWM carrier, as it just gets "burned up" in the big transformer if not filtered out. If the big transformer is getting the 24KHz SPWM carrier, it'll get hot. In my experience, the more ferrite choke filtration on the transformer primary wires, the higher the DC input voltage you can run...without the no-load current going up excessively. Conversely, the less the ferrite choke filtration on the transformer primary wires, the sooner you'll notice high no-load currents & heat. PJ seems to provide one ferrite choke on their inverters...and always with just a single turn of transformer primary wire through it. In my experience, the best performance is found with 2 full turns of transformer primary wire through the ferrite. Adding a second ferrite choke to the other transformer primary leg (with 2 turns) helps with higher battery voltages.
    1 point
  23. the kitchen stove would be my only 220ac use in the future I use my 15kw powerjack L1 N L2 in the winter running 220v stove and water heater and portable heater no problem with resistive load . Thank you for the information of the ASL6.5 voltages .
    1 point
  24. Unfortunately, this is a hardware issue with the way the transformer was wound. And doubly unfortunately, the low voltage side is on the OUTSIDE. Technically speaking, if you can extend the "line" wire for the low phase coil Oh no , I was thinking ASL6.5 the L1 is 120vac and L2 is 120vac . The low phase coil 107vac need 10 to 15 more turns to make L2 be 117 vac . Now try to not use inductive load on L2 like air compressor or well pump or large freezer or microwave . I think Powerjack save a lot of wires with split phase being 220vac instead of 240 vac .
    1 point
  25. what is the output of the secondary winding? The primary signal IN is the input voltage to the transformer primary winding which come from the LF driver is 16vac to 18vac . The transformer need AC to function . The control board convert the 24v dc input to 18vac to the transformer is what the signal IN gauge on the box show and show the LF driver is working . The secondary winding convert the 18vac to 240v ac measure between L1 and L2 hopefully . L1 N should be 120vac and L2 N should be 120vac . Can you show what you measure between L1 N and between L2 N ? My ASL9.0 transformer measure L1 N is 116vac and L2 N is 104vac which is 220vac . This is not good for wiring L1 N L2 because unbalanced . That is why Powerjack do not want people to wire L1 N L2 but can be done if the ASL6.5 is balanced 120vac and 240vac .
    1 point
  26. it seems they are selling or at least offering for sale less of their older style inverters. but they get more confusing in their wiring The last youtube video by Sean say people call about a powerjack manual on how to wire L1 N L2 and a lot of PS inverter are return because of miss wired . The new AMG powerjack inverter suppose to make for less return because it is wired for 120vac on option A and wired for 240vac on option B . There is no warranty if wired L1 N L2 but it can be wired L1 N L2 if you use option B but do not tell powerjack . I do not think Powerjack know what L1 N L2 split phase mean . It mean L1 is 120vac and L2 is 120vac to be perfect balanced and not L1 is 116vac and L2 is 104vac . It takes 15 more turns of wire to make L2 to get 116 vac to match L1 at 116vac . They save a lots of wires .
    1 point
  27. Ha, yes...it seems to me that LFP are quite easy to balance. My balancers got fairly hot the first few days--but that was it. Now they never get even the slightest bit warm. Probably don't even need a heatsink. Li-Ion batteries on the other hand...they never seem to fully balance and are always running the balancers really hot. Or else I've never had good Li-Ion batteries...
    1 point
  28. Seems the best way to manage that is to keep the settings for bulk and float fairly close together, which you are already doing. Can't stop the microcycling completely, so minimize it with tight settings. Making bulk and float equal defeats the purpose of having two setpoints, so back to personal choice. What settings do we believe provide the best performance balanced with the best preservation of cell life. At this point, until I see some persuasive evidence to adopt different setpoints, I like the results i'm getting with my current settings. Time will tell....
    1 point
  29. some strange inverters with 4 wires to the output side AMG version Wiring option A for 120vac only L1 N 1 and L2 N2 but no 240vac and can not L1 N L2 or bad thing will happen . Wiring option B for 240vac direct wiring to 240vac inductive load such as air compressor or well pump . Can also be wire L1 N L2 for pure split phase 240vac but make sure load on L1 and L2 are the same or bad thing will happen Bad is like FET blew up and the main board catch on fire . I think your ASL6.5 transformer is balance L1 is 120vac and L2 is 120vac so wiring L1 N l2 will work ok . Many powerjack transformer is not balance like ASL9.0 where L1 is 115vac and L2 is 105vac so I wire direct L1 and L2 for 240vac and has to be careful wiring L1 N L2 and watch the load . .
    1 point
  30. Might be taking a playbook from the GS transformer winding spec and such for that, haha (note the comments about "Also the same coil we put more wires on the transformer about 1.5 times than before")... With the "AMG" setup, PJ is making an inverter that you can theoretically reconfigure between 120v single phase and 240v split phase output by rewiring a couple of jumpers on the 4 position connector. In essence, you have 2 120v secondaries of the transformer that can be wired in parallel for single-phase, and put in series for split-phase. Actually not a bad idea. The catch is that any and all voltage regulation takes place at 120v (which actually is quite common in PJ inverters); if you load down the "240v output", the inverter will not correct for the sag on the unregulated secondary. If that's not a problem, these inverters might do quite well for you.
    1 point
  31. when you switch it to power sav on the switch it repeatedly bounces up to 10 on the analog volt meter Correct reading . Your inverter is good and the ASL6.5 transformer is good .
    1 point
  32. transformer box only reads about 18 That is the correct input ac voltage for the 24v ASL6.5 transformer . My 48v ASL9.0 transformer read 36vac for input . Your LF driver is working good .
    1 point
  33. when the inverter is turned off it still draws.07 to .09 amps. there are no fans running but this is probably the no load consumption with the inverter attached to the LIFePO4 battry but turned off. when the inverter is turned on it reads 1.89 to 1.91 amps using the tacklife clamp on meter on the negative 4/0 copper cable between the inverter and the LiFePO4 tech direct pre-built battery. there is nothing attached at all on the load side but you can hear the terroidal transformer humming...... the tech direct 5 kwh battery has a 130 amp built-in BMS and circuit breaker. so right now i do not have a class T fuse installed; but will have when i hook it up to the 32 cell Lishen battetry i am assembling. 2 pics coming. dont mind the mess!
    1 point
  34. Have you been able to measure the no-load power consumption of the inverter? One "FYI" is that pretty much all commercially available fans are rated to a surprisingly low voltage. A Delta FFB1224VHE (151CFM) fan is usually rated for 14.0-26.4vDC input. https://www.delta-fan.com/Download/Spec/FFB1224VHE-R00.pdf While the fans WILL run at voltages beyond their rating, I HAVE had a FFB1248EHE Delta 48v fan (rated to 53v) fail after less than a year at 56.0-56.5v. Replaced it, and the other identical fans are still running today--but still! https://www.delta-fan.com/Download/Spec/FFB1248EHE-F00.pdf This is why GS inverters have custom-designed fans. 24v inverters have fans rated for 20-40vDC input. The other fans we have are rated 38-75vDC input.
    1 point
  35. Well, I'm calling it a successful operation! I'll be leaving the charge settings where they are, 56.8 bulk and 56v float. The cells are well balanced for the most part. The 3 cells mentioned before are still a touch lower than the rest when at full charge, but still improving slowly. Even if they get no closer, they are close enough. Not new batteries, remember. And I am able to utilize a 56v charge versus 54v before. A significant addition to my bank's capacity just with that change. So now I have to get another 8 balancers and put them on my 24v bank. ( 6 more of the same type BYD modules all in parallel. - The fun never ends!)
    1 point
  36. thank you! your assurance has put my mind at ease.
    1 point
  37. So with about 50 inverters shipped at this point...we have had ZERO issues with the transformer mounting. Sure, there's been an odd issue or 2 with transformer wire chafing causing strange issues (i.e. wire rubbing against a sharp edge during shipping, wearing through the insulation), but that can be addressed during assembly. We had several issues with external broken terminal blocks on the FIRST design revision of the inverter, which was resolved with the 2nd design revision (using a solid terminal block & a dedicated metal box). In short, the transformers are mounted quite sturdily; you're not likely to have a problem. I will note that Sean has seen some truly smashed-up inverters while doing repairs for PJ--if the transformer is floating loose in the chassis during shipping, it basically becomes a wrecking ball, and the inverter is a complete write-off. (GS inverters have the transformer bracket mounted in contact with the transformer [no gaps], which prevents the transformer from moving in the first place.) If the transformer came loose in a GS inverter during shipping, we would have to replace the inverter at our loss. There would be nothing left that a customer could repair--or for that matter, use. If you want to crack the inverter open and mod/remount things as you want to, that's entirely up to you--however, we at Genetry Solar aren't liable for damages/failure/injury or other unexpected possible scenarios. If something does go wrong in this case, however, we will still provide help and replacement parts as needed (just without the warranty coverage.) ONE WARNING/NOTE: If you do re-mount the transformer, REMEMBER: You cannot have a full loop of metal around the core (through the center and around the outside), or this said metal will basically turn into a "winding" of the transformer, and get EXTREMELY HOT in minutes (fire hazard). Funny part is that the inverter likely won't notice--you'll just notice a slightly elevated no-load current, and then your nose will start to tell you that something's wrong. Have to say, I've done it myself...took me a moment to figure out what was going on! (The GS inverter uses a plastic insulator on the center bolt to prevent this.)
    1 point
  38. Sure thing. Mounting holes are roughly 11.25" across by 18.5" longwise. (measuring from the left side of the left mounting hole to the left side of the right mounting hole.) (measuring from the bottom of the top mounting hole, to the bottom of the bottom mounting hole.) Thank you for your order! Pleased to report that tests on the prototype Rev. C board are coming along very nicely. Likely will delay the inverter shipments a tad (for those that want the Rev. C control board), but so far so good.
    1 point
  39. My understanding of it is that at higher voltages the growth rate of dendrites becomes an issue. Continual 3.65V will still see the cell do the rated number of charge/discharge cycles but if maximising cell life is the plan, the 80/20 SOC window is the way to go. Charging up to 95+% SOC, holding for a while, then releasing back and holding a lower voltage is still recommended for most systems, unless you have a high current balancing system such as Sid's, as this allows a typical BMS with < 200mA of balancing current capability to bring all the cells to the same voltage. The higher up the SOC curve you go the lower the balancing current. I charge my own batteries up to 3.6V / cell, let them balance for a while up there, then drop back to 3.375V / cell.
    1 point
  40. Have to admit that my last two FFB1248 Delta fans burned out just before I was headed out the door to drive to Sean's place a few days ago (after about 1.5 years of service). Smelled terrible--and delayed my trip half an hour to replace them with proper GS fans with a wide input voltage range. (I originally had 3 Delta FFB1248EHE fans, and one of them burned out a few months after I put it in service.) The listed voltage on those Delta fans is no joke. If it's listed to a max of 26.5v, it will be prone to random failure if taken past that...
    0 points
  41. "Power Sav" is a conceptual idea that doesn't work at all in real life--I've never had it work on a PJ inverter. Even if it did function, it'll only "see" L1 loads anyway (i.e. L2 loads won't cause the inverter to exit "power save" mode). Concept is for the inverter to turn off for a few seconds...turn back on to see if there's a load, and if not, turn back off. If it detects a load, it'll stay ON until the load disappears. At least that's the original idea.
    0 points
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